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Be Kind to Animals Week


Be Kind to Animals Week is the first full week of May each year, and the longest running commemorative week in U.S. history. This year is its 103rd year and it will take place May 6-12. 1916 was the first year of the American Humane animal rescue services program, when the U.S. Secretary of War wanted to save war horses during World War I in Europe. Since then, they have been involved in everything from Pearl Harbor to 9/11. This week is an opportunity to celebrate the joy that animals bring to people, and the importance of them to mother nature.

There are plenty of ways to celebrate this week of keep kindness. If thinking about adding a furry friend to a home, consider about adopting from a local shelter. If there’s already a pet in the home, make an appointment to get them up to date on their shots and a wellness exam, and make sure that they are wearing the proper identification. And don’t forget to appreciate the wildlife! 

If there is space outside the home, there are creative ways to make an area to bring wildlife closer, like bird feeders for birds or a butterfly garden. While there are some animals that might need to be kept away from a home, there are still ways that people and those animals can coexist peacefully. Check out the link at http://www.americanhumane.org/fact-sheet/wildlife/ to learn more. Another way to look out for animals is to report animal abuse. Those animals need help, and it is the responsibility of anyone who sees to report it as accurately as possible to the authorities so the perpetrators can be held responsible for their actions. 

American Humane is urging everyone to take the pledge to be kind and to have compassion for all animals. There are four ways to pledge. One is to buy humanely raised products, like cage free eggs and other meat and dairy products to support the welfare of 10 billion farm animals. Another pledge is to protect the earth’s animals by learning about conservation efforts and visiting humane certified zoos and aquariums. Protecting animal actors has become a hot button lately, so people can also pledge to that when they see the, “No Animals Were Harmed,” credit before seeing a movie, ensuring the safety of thousands of animals. The last one, mentioned above earlier, is to adopt a pet instead of going to a pet shop. 

Visit www.Kindness100.org to pledge to be kind, to learn more about American Humane’s work, and to find ways to involve children at a young age to be empathetic towards animals. While we have grown to understand how important animals are to us and the earth, we still have a long way to go, so please pledge today, and always have kindness, compassion and empathy towards all animals.